ROCKEFELLER CENTER

A large complex consisting of 19 high-rise commercial buildings between 48th and 51st streets. Commissioned by the Rockefeller family, it is located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, spanning the area between Fifth and Sixth Avenue. Declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987, it is famous for its annual Christmas tree lighting. If you come by this season don´t forget to pay a visit!

TIMES SQUARE

A major commercial intersection, entertainment center and neighborhood in Midtown Manhattan. Brightly adorned with billboards and advertisements, "The Crossroads of the World”, "The Center of the Universe”, or the "heart of the world”, is one of the world's busiest pedestrian areas, and also the hub of the Broadway Theater District and a major center of the world's entertainment industry.

GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL

Is a commuter, rapid transit and intercity railroad terminal at 42nd Street and Park Avenue. Built by and named for the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad in the heyday of American long-distance passenger rail travel, it covers 48 acres (19ha) and has 44 below-ground platforms, more than any other railroad station in the world. The total number of tracks along platforms and in rail yards exceeds 100.

CENTRAL PARK

The most visited urban park in the United States with 40 million visitors in 2013, and one of the most filmed locations in the world. The park was established in 1857 on 778 acres (315 ha) of city-owned land. In 1858, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux won a design competition to improve and expand the park with a plan they titled the "Greensward Plan". Construction began the same year and the park's first area was opened to the public in the winter of 1858, and continued during the American Civil War farther north.

EMPIRE STATE BUILDING

Is a 102-story skyscraper located on Fifth Avenue, between West 33rd and 34th Streets in Midtown Manhattan. It has a roof height of 1,250ft (381m), and with its antenna included, it stands a total of 1,454ft (443.2m) tall. Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State. The Empire State Building is currently the fifth-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States and the 35th-tallest in the world.

BROOKLYN BRIDGE

An hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge, one of the oldest ones in the United States. Started in 1869 and completed in 1883, it connects the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River. It has a main span of 1,595.5ft (486.3m) and was the first steel-wire suspension bridge constructed. Originally called the New York and Brooklyn Bridge and the East River Bridge, it was later dubbed the Brooklyn Bridge, a name coming from an earlier January 25, 1867, letter to the editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle and formally so named by the city government in 1915. Since opening, it has become an icon of New York City and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964 and a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1972.

STATUE OF LIBERTY

The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York City, in the United States. The copper statue, a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States, was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and built by Gustave Eiffel. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886.

CHINATOWN

Neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, bordering the Lower East Side to its east, Little Italy to its north, Civic Center to its south, and Tribeca to its west. Chinatown is home to the largest enclave of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere, with an estimated population 100,000 people, is also one of the oldest Chinese ethnic enclaves. Historically it was primarily populated by Cantonese speakers. However, in the 1980s-90s, large numbers of Fuzhounese-speaking immigrants also arrived. As many Fuzhounese and Cantonese speakers now speak Mandarin —the official language in China and Taiwan— in addition to their native languages, this made it more important for Chinatown residents to learn and speak Mandarin.

MADAME TUSSAUDS NEW YORK

Is a wax museum located on 42nd Street close to Times Square in New York City. Madame Tussauds was founded by the wax sculptor, Marie Tussaud, and is now operated by the United Kingdom-based entertainment company, Merlin Entertainments. The Madame Tussauds New York location opened in 2000 with five floors of attraction space and over 200 figures; it has quickly become a popular destination in New York City.

BROADWAY

It is the oldest north–south main thoroughfare in New York City, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement, although most of it did not bear its current name until the late 19th century. The name Broadway is the English language literal translation of the Dutch name, Brede weg. Broadway is known widely as the heart of the American theatre industry.

9/11 MEMORIAL

Commemorates the September 11, 2001 attacks, which killed 2,977 victims, and the World Trade Center bombing of 1993, which killed six. The memorial is located at the World Trade Center site, the former location of the Twin Towers, which were destroyed during the September 11 attacks. It is operated by a non-profit corporation whose mission is to raise funds for, program, own, and operate the memorial and museum at the World Trade Center site.

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Is one of the largest museums in the world. Located in park-like grounds across the street from Central Park, the museum complex comprises 28 interconnected buildings housing 45 permanent exhibition halls, in addition to a planetarium and a library. The museum collections contain over 33 million specimens of plants, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, human remains, and human cultural artifacts, of which only a small fraction can be displayed at any given time, and occupies more than 2,000,000 square ft2 (190,000 m2). The museum has a full-time scientific staff of 225, sponsors over 120 special field expeditions each year, and averages about 5 million visits annually.

THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

The Solomon R. Guggenheim is the permanent home of a continuously expanding collection of Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, early Modern and contemporary art, and also features special exhibitions throughout the year. Was established by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1939 as the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, under the guidance of its first director, the artist Hilla von Rebay. It adopted its current name after the death of its founder, Solomon R. Guggenheim, in 1952.

MUSEUM OF MODERN ART (MoMA)

MoMA has been important in developing and collecting modernist art, and is often identified as one of the largest and most influential museums of modern art in the world. MoMA's collection offers an overview of modern and contemporary art, including works of architecture and design, drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, prints, illustrated books and artist's books, film, and electronic media.

The MoMA Library includes approximately 300,000 books and exhibition catalogs, over 1,000 periodical titles, and over 40,000 files of ephemera about individual artists and groups. The archives holds primary source material related to the history of modern and contemporary art.

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ROCKEFELLER

CENTER

A large complex consisting of 19 high-rise commercial buildings between 48th and 51st streets. Commissioned by the Rockefeller family, it is located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, spanning the area between Fifth and Sixth Avenue. Declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987, it is famous for its annual Christmas tree lighting. If you come by this season don´t forget to pay a visit!

TIMES

SQUARE

A major commercial intersection, entertainment center and neighborhood in Midtown Manhattan. Brightly adorned with billboards and advertisements, "The Crossroads of the World”, "The Center of the Universe”, or the "heart of the world”, is one of the world's busiest pedestrian areas, and also the hub of the Broadway Theater District and a major center of the world's entertainment industry.

GRAND CENTRAL

TERMINAL

Is a commuter, rapid transit and intercity railroad terminal at 42nd Street and Park Avenue. Built by and named for the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad in the heyday of American long-distance passenger rail travel, it covers 48 acres (19ha) and has 44 below-ground platforms, more than any other railroad station in the world. The total number of tracks along platforms and in rail yards exceeds 100.

EMPIRE STATE

BUILDING

Is a 102-story skyscraper located on Fifth Avenue, between West 33rd and 34th Streets in Midtown Manhattan. It has a roof height of 1,250ft (381m), and with its antenna included, it stands a total of 1,454ft (443.2m) tall. Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State. The Empire State Building is currently the fifth-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States and the 35th-tallest in the world.

CENTRAL

PARK

The most visited urban park in the United States with 40 million visitors in 2013, and one of the most filmed locations in the world. The park was established in 1857 on 778 acres (315 ha) of city-owned land. In 1858, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux won a design competition to improve and expand the park with a plan they titled the "Greensward Plan". Construction began the same year and the park's first area was opened to the public in the winter of 1858, and continued during the American Civil War farther north.

BROOKLYN

BRIDGE

An hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge, one of the oldest ones in the United States. Started in 1869 and completed in 1883, it connects the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River. It has a main span of 1,595.5ft (486.3m) and was the first steel-wire suspension bridge constructed. Originally called the New York and Brooklyn Bridge and the East River Bridge, it was later dubbed the Brooklyn Bridge, a name coming from an earlier January 25, 1867, letter to the editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle and formally so named by the city government in 1915. Since opening, it has become an icon of New York City and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964 and a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1972.

THE STATUE

OF LIBERTY

The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York City, in the United States. The copper statue, a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States, was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and built by Gustave Eiffel. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886.

9/11 MEMORIAL

& MUSEUM

Commemorates the September 11, 2001 attacks, which killed 2,977 victims, and the World Trade Center bombing of 1993, which killed six. The memorial is located at the World Trade Center site, the former location of the Twin Towers, which were destroyed during the September 11 attacks. It is operated by a non-profit corporation whose mission is to raise funds for, program, own, and operate the memorial and museum at the World Trade Center site.

CHINATOWN

Neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, bordering the Lower East Side to its east, Little Italy to its north, Civic Center to its south, and Tribeca to its west. Chinatown is home to the largest enclave of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere, with an estimated population 100,000 people, is also one of the oldest Chinese ethnic enclaves. Historically it was primarily populated by Cantonese speakers. However, in the 1980s-90s, large numbers of Fuzhounese-speaking immigrants also arrived. As many Fuzhounese and Cantonese speakers now speak Mandarin —the official language in China and Taiwan— in addition to their native languages, this made it more important for Chinatown residents to learn and speak Mandarin.

AMERICAN MUSEUM

OF NATURAL HISTORY

Is one of the largest museums in the world. Located in park-like grounds across the street from Central Park, the museum complex comprises 28 interconnected buildings housing 45 permanent exhibition halls, in addition to a planetarium and a library. The museum collections contain over 33 million specimens of plants, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, human remains, and human cultural artifacts, of which only a small fraction can be displayed at any given time, and occupies more than 2,000,000 square ft2 (190,000 m2). The museum has a full-time scientific staff of 225, sponsors over 120 special field expeditions each year, and averages about 5 million visits annually.

MADAME TUSSAUDS
NEW YORK

Is a wax museum located on 42nd Street close to Times Square in New York City. Madame Tussauds was founded by the wax sculptor, Marie Tussaud, and is now operated by the United Kingdom-based entertainment company, Merlin Entertainments. The Madame Tussauds New York location opened in 2000 with five floors of attraction space and over 200 figures; it has quickly become a popular destination in New York City.

THE GUGGENHEIM

MUSEUM

The Solomon R. Guggenheim is an art museum and the permanent home of a continuously expanding collection of Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, early Modern and contemporary art, and also features special exhibitions throughout the year. Was established by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1939 as the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, under the guidance of its first director, the artist Hilla von Rebay. It adopted its current name after the death of its founder, Solomon R. Guggenheim, in 1952.

BROADWAY

It is the oldest north–south main thoroughfare in New York City, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement, although most of it did not bear its current name until the late 19th century. The name Broadway is the English language literal translation of the Dutch name, Brede weg. Broadway is known widely as the heart of the American theatre industry.

MUSEUM OF MODERN

ART (MoMA)

MoMA has been important in developing and collecting modernist art, and is often identified as one of the largest and most influential museums of modern art in the world. MoMA's collection offers an overview of modern and contemporary art, including works of architecture and design, drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, prints, illustrated books and artist's books, film, and electronic media.

The MoMA Library includes approximately 300,000 books and exhibition catalogs, over 1,000 periodical titles, and over 40,000 files of ephemera about individual artists and groups. The archives holds primary source material related to the history of modern and contemporary art.